Radiocarbon dating two artefacts found in Loch Kinord

Results are in for the radiocarbon dating of two artefacts found in Loch Kinord in the 19th century. The artefacts are a shaft of a bronze spearhead and a fragment of a logboat which when found measured over 9m in length. The spearhead had been suggested to have a Late Bronze Age date, between 1000 BC and 800 BC, based on the style of the metal work. However, the preserved wooden shaft found within the spearhead had not been directly dated and there was suspicion that it might be a Victorian re-creation dating to the time the spearhead was found.

Bronze Spearhead

But we can now say that is not the case, the radiocarbon result has confirmed and tightened the date range that the typology of the spearhead suggested – late Bronze Age from the 9th century BC. This is the very end of the Bronze Age and coincidentally this is the period of the very earliest radiocarbon determinations from a handful of crannog sites. You can read more about Late Bronze Age metal work in [[this]] lengthy paper (it was written 50 years ago, so forgive it for some things that have been reconsidered).

In addition to the shaft of the spearhead, a fragment of a logboat was also radiocarbon dated. The logboat was also found in Loch Kinord in the 19th century, and was known at the time as the ‘Royal Yacht’ referring the local association between the loch and Malcolm Canmore. Logboats in Scotland date from as early as the Mesolithic through the Medieval period. This has made the radiocarbon date exceptionally important as there is no other way to even narrow down 6-7 thousand years of possible use.

Logboat Fragment

However, the result was 6th-7th century AD. This is a very interesting result for a number of reasons. First, the date, roughly AD 550-650 is just more than a century before the radiocarbon date from a pile from Prison Island – possibly indicating contemporary use. Early Medieval logboat use is well attested in the archaeological records of Britain and Ireland, so there are many potential parallels to discuss. But one that stands out is a logboat dated to 8th century AD from the Loch of Kinnordy near Kirriemuir (the names of the lochs, Kinord and Kinnordy, are coincidence). If you check the Canmore site record [[here]], you can click on the digitised image of a drawing by Robert Mowat of the Kinnordy boat. Note the animistic head on the prow, a hint of what might have been lost from the ‘Royal Yacht’.

There are more radiocarbon date results to be returned from Loch Kinord in the coming weeks and months.

Thanks to the Aberdeen Humanities Fund for providing funding for the radiocarbon dates. Thanks also to Marishcal College Museum Curator Neil Curtis for granting permission for the samples to be taken. I must also thank Caroline and Ray again who were so helpful in taking the samples.

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